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Forgetting : the benefits of not remembering / Scott A. Small.

Small, Scott A., (author.).

Available copies

  • 4 of 6 copies available at Bibliomation. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Slater Public Library - Griswold.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Slater Public Library - Griswold 153.1 SMA (Text to phone) 31252140647728 Adult New Nonfiction Available -

Record details

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-211) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
To remember, to forget -- Quiet minds -- Liberated minds -- Fearless minds -- Lightening minds -- Humble minds -- Communal minds -- Epilogue: Pathological forgetting.
Summary, etc.:
"A renowned neurologist explains why our routine forgetting-of names, dates, even house keys-is not a brain failure but actually, when combined with memory, one of the mind's most beneficial functions. Who wouldn't want a better memory? Dr. Scott Small has dedicated his career to understanding why memory forsakes us. As director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Columbia University, he focuses largely on patients who experience pathological forgetting, and it is in contrast to their suffering that normal forgetting, which we experience every day, appears in sharp relief. Until recently, most everyone-memory scientists included-believed that forgetting served no purpose. But new research in psychology, neurobiology, medicine, and computer science tells a different story. Forgetting is not a failure of our minds. It's not even a benign glitch. It is, in fact, good for us-and, alongside memory, it is a required function for our minds to work best. Forgetting benefits our cognitive and creative abilities, emotional well-being, and even our personal and societal health. As frustrating as a typical lapse can be, it's precisely what opens up our minds to making better decisions, experiencing joy and relationships, and flourishing artistically. From studies of bonobos in the wild to visits with the iconic painter Jasper Johns and the renowned decision-making expert Daniel Kahneman, Small looks across disciplines to put new scientific findings into illuminating context while also revealing groundbreaking developments about Alzheimer's disease. The next time you forget where you left your keys, remember that a little forgetting does a lot of good"-- Provided by publisher.
Subject: Memory disorders.
Memory.
Cognition.
LDR 03268cam a2200421 i 4500
001on1257486635
003OCoLC
00520210809040247.0
008210624t20212021nyua e b 001 0 eng
010 . ‡a 2021011986
040 . ‡aDLC ‡beng ‡erda ‡cFMG ‡dFMG ‡dOCLCO ‡dFM0 ‡dYDX ‡dBDX ‡dOTP ‡dLEB ‡dOQX ‡dUAP ‡dOCLCF ‡dLNT ‡dCBY ‡dBIB
019 . ‡a1194870310
020 . ‡a9780593136195 ‡q(hardcover)
020 . ‡a0593136195 ‡q(hardcover)
035 . ‡a(OCoLC)1257486635 ‡z(OCoLC)1194870310
05000. ‡aBF376 ‡b.S56 2021
08200. ‡a153.1/2 ‡223
049 . ‡aBIBA
1001 . ‡aSmall, Scott A., ‡eauthor.
24510. ‡aForgetting : ‡bthe benefits of not remembering / ‡cScott A. Small.
250 . ‡aFirst edition.
264 1. ‡aNew York : ‡bCrown, ‡c[2021]
264 4. ‡c©2021
300 . ‡a224 pages : ‡billustrations ; ‡c22 cm
336 . ‡atext ‡btxt ‡2rdacontent
336 . ‡astill image ‡bsti ‡2rdacontent
337 . ‡aunmediated ‡bn ‡2rdamedia
338 . ‡avolume ‡bnc ‡2rdacarrier
504 . ‡aIncludes bibliographical references (pages 201-211) and index.
5050 . ‡aTo remember, to forget -- Quiet minds -- Liberated minds -- Fearless minds -- Lightening minds -- Humble minds -- Communal minds -- Epilogue: Pathological forgetting.
520 . ‡a"A renowned neurologist explains why our routine forgetting-of names, dates, even house keys-is not a brain failure but actually, when combined with memory, one of the mind's most beneficial functions. Who wouldn't want a better memory? Dr. Scott Small has dedicated his career to understanding why memory forsakes us. As director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Columbia University, he focuses largely on patients who experience pathological forgetting, and it is in contrast to their suffering that normal forgetting, which we experience every day, appears in sharp relief. Until recently, most everyone-memory scientists included-believed that forgetting served no purpose. But new research in psychology, neurobiology, medicine, and computer science tells a different story. Forgetting is not a failure of our minds. It's not even a benign glitch. It is, in fact, good for us-and, alongside memory, it is a required function for our minds to work best. Forgetting benefits our cognitive and creative abilities, emotional well-being, and even our personal and societal health. As frustrating as a typical lapse can be, it's precisely what opens up our minds to making better decisions, experiencing joy and relationships, and flourishing artistically. From studies of bonobos in the wild to visits with the iconic painter Jasper Johns and the renowned decision-making expert Daniel Kahneman, Small looks across disciplines to put new scientific findings into illuminating context while also revealing groundbreaking developments about Alzheimer's disease. The next time you forget where you left your keys, remember that a little forgetting does a lot of good"-- ‡cProvided by publisher.
650 0. ‡aMemory disorders.
650 0. ‡aMemory.
650 0. ‡aCognition.
77608. ‡iOnline version: ‡aSmall, Scott A. ‡tForgetting ‡dNew York : Crown, [2021] ‡z9780593136201 ‡w(DLC) 2021011987
938 . ‡aBrodart ‡bBROD ‡n127750185
938 . ‡aYBP Library Services ‡bYANK ‡n16940628
994 . ‡aC0 ‡bBIB
905 . ‡ucordelia
901 . ‡aon1257486635 ‡bOCoLC ‡c4357671 ‡tbiblio ‡sOCLC

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